‘Occupy’ Protesters Halt Operations at Some West Coast Ports

Published December 12, 2011
| Associated Press

OAKLAND, Calif. –  More than 1,000 Occupy Wall Street protesters blocked cargo trucks at some of the West Coast’s busiest ports Monday, forcing terminals in Oakland, Calif., Portland, Ore., and Longview, Wash., to halt operations.

While the protests attracted far fewer people than the 10,000 who turned out Nov. 2 to shut down Oakland’s port, organizers declared victory and promised more demonstrations to come.

“The truckers are still here, but there’s nobody here to unload their stuff,” protest organizer Boots Riley said. “We shut down the Port of Oakland for the daytime shift and we’re coming back in the evening. Mission accomplished.”

Organizers called for the “Shutdown Wall Street on the Waterfront” protests, hoping the day of demonstrations would cut into the profits of the corporations that run the docks and send a message that their movement was not over.

The closures’ economic impact, however, wasn’t immediately clear.

The longshoremen’s union did not officially support the protests, but its membership cited a provision in its contract that allowed workers to ask to stay off the job if they felt the conditions were unsafe.

Some went home with several hours’ pay, while others left with nothing.

Oakland Longshoreman DeAndre Whitten was OK with it. “I hope they keep it up,” said Whitten, who lost about $500. “I have no problem with it. But my wife wasn’t happy about it.”

Others, such as the truck drivers who had to wait in long lines as protesters blocked gates, were angry, saying the demonstrators were harming the very people they were trying to help.

“This is joke. What are they protesting?” said Christian Vega, who sat in his truck carrying a load of recycled paper. He said the delay was costing him $600. “It only hurts me and the other drivers.

“We have jobs and families to support and feed,” he said. “Most of them don’t.”

From Long Beach, Calif., to as far away as Anchorage, Alaska, and Vancouver, British Columbia, protesters beat drums and carried signs as they marched outside the gates. There were a handful of arrests, but no major clashes with police.

Rain dampened some protests. Several hundred showed up at the Port of Long Beach and left after several hours.

The movement, which sprang up this fall against what it sees as corporate greed and economic inequality, is focusing on the ports as the “economic engines for the elite.” It comes weeks after police raids cleared out most of their tent camps.

The port protests are a “response to show them that it’s going to hurt their pocketbooks if they attack us brutally like that,” Riley said.

Protesters are most upset by two West Coast companies: port operator SSA Marine and grain exporter EGT. Investment banking giant Goldman Sachs Group Inc. owns a major stake in SSA Marine and has been a frequent target of protesters.

They say they are standing up for workers against the port companies, which have had high-profile clashes with union workers lately. Longshoremen in Longview, for example, have had a longstanding dispute with EGT.

In a statement, EGT officials pointed out that the company employs workers from a different union to staff its terminal. The longshoremen’s union says the jobs rightfully belong to them.

“Disrupting port activities makes it harder for U.S. manufacturing, the farm community and countless others to sell to customers and contribute to our nation’s economic recovery,” EGT chief executive Larry Clarke said.

While the demonstrations were largely peaceful and isolated to a few gates at each port, local officials in the longshoremen’s union and port officials or shipping companies determined that the conditions were unsafe for workers.

In Oakland, several hundred people picketed before dawn and blocked some trucks from going through at least two entrances.

A long line of big rigs sat outside one of the entrances, unable to drive into the port. Police in riot gear stood by as protesters marched in an oval and carried signs. Protesters cheered when they learned about the partial shutdown and then dispersed.

Shipping companies and the union agreed to send home about 150 workers, essentially halting operations at two terminals. Those in unaffected parts of the port remained on the job.

“It’s disappointing that those union folks were not able to go to work today and earn their wages,” said Bob Watters, spokesman for SSA Marine. “We think that everything is pretty well in hand and operations are moving along pretty well now.”

Scott Olsen, the Marine Corps veteran who was struck in the head during a clash between police and Occupy Oakland protests in October, led nearly 1,000 people marching to the Port of Oakland on Monday evening.

A spokesman for the longshoremen’s union says shippers at the port would typically request 100 to 200 workers for the overnight shift but weren’t asking for any Monday due to the ongoing protests.

In Portland, a couple hundred protesters blocked semitrailers from making deliveries at two major terminals.

Security concerns were raised when police found two people in camouflage clothing with a gun, sword and walkie-talkies who said they were doing reconnaissance.

Port officials erected fences and told workers to stay home, port spokesman Josh Thomas said. He said port officials didn’t know early Monday afternoon the full economic impact of the blockade.

“We’re talking about tenants, customers, truckers, rail providers, a pretty far reaching group, and most of these people are not employed by the port,” Thomas said. “To say it’s going to be X amount of dollars right now is impossible.”

Kari Koch, an Occupy spokeswoman, said the two people taken into custody were not part of the demonstration.

“We do not send out folks with guns,” Koch said.

The decision to shut down the two terminals was relayed to about 200 workers from the longshoremen’s union, which said it sympathized with the goals of the movement but disagreed with shutting down operations that would deprive its members of pay.

Longshoremen at the Longview port went home over concerns for their health and safety, union spokeswoman Jennifer Sargent said. A port spokeswoman, Ashley Helenberg, said the port and the union made the decision jointly.

If union workers participated in the protest, Sargent said, they did so as individuals, not as part of the union.

In Seattle, about 100 protesters briefly blocked a street near the port. Several dozen police cleared the road after the group stopped traffic for about 20 minutes. At least one person was taken into custody.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/12/12/occupy-protesters-seek-to-shut-down-west-coast-ports/#ixzz1gNOYFWaD

Obama to slash National Guard force on U.S.-Mexico border

Meanwhile, they’re talking about putting in new unmanned border crossings.  This bullshit just keeps getting worse, they have no intention of securing the border.
By Stephen DinanThe Washington Times
Monday, December 12, 2011

Blaming budget cuts, the Obama administration early next year will cut the number of National Guard troops patrolling the U.S.-Mexico border by at least half, according to a congressman who was briefed on the plan.

The National Guard said an announcement will be made by the White House “in the near future,” but Rep. Duncan Hunter, a California Republican who has learned of the plans, said slashing the deployment in half is the minimum number, and he said it will mean reshuffling the remaining troops along the nearly 2,000-mile border.

In California, that will mean going from 264 Guard troops down to just 14, he said.

Mr. Hunter said the pending cuts are another reason Congress and President Obama should revisit the automatic defense spending reductions that kicked in with the failure last month of the deficit super-committee to reach a broader spending deal.

“What’s apparent now is that a decision not to continue their deployment, even though it might be in the national interest to do so, would be based entirely on budget constraints on the Defense Department,” Mr. Hunter said.

Mr. Obama deployed 1,200 guard troops to the border in June 2010 in an effort to bolster the U.S. Border Patrol and try to prevent the growing drug violence in Mexico from spilling into the U.S.

He charged the National Guard with aiding in intelligence-gathering and other backup duties, though troops have not been actually enforcing immigration laws.

The troops were scheduled to be drawn down this June, but Mr. Obama extended their deployment, saying there was still work to be done.

The troops were meant to be a bridge to beef up support staffing while the Border Patrol hired more agents under a bill Congress passed early in his term.

In 2006 President George W. Bush sent 6,000 National Guard troops to the border. Republican 2012 presidential hopefuls have routinely slammed the Obama administration for not doing enough to secure the borders.

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2011/dec/12/obama-slash-national-guard-force-us-mexico-border/

Butter shortage in Norway, prices near $500 lb

I can’t believe it’s not butter!

Norway butter shortage threatens Christmas treats

Sapa-AFP | 12 December, 2011 17:42

An acute butter shortage in Norway, one of the world’s richest countries, has left people worrying how to bake their Christmas goodies with store shelves emptied and prices through the roof.

The shortfall, expected to last into January, amounts to between 500 and 1,000 tonnes, said Tine, Norway’s main dairy company, while online sellers have offered 500-gramme packs for up to 350 euros ($465).

The dire shortage poses a serious challenge for Norwegians who are trying to finish their traditional Christmas baking — a task which usually requires them to make at least seven different kinds of biscuits.

The shortfall has been blamed on a rainy summer that cut into feed production and therefore dairy output, but also the ballooning popularity of a low-carbohydrate, fat-rich diet that has sent demand for butter soaring.

“Compared to 2010, demand has grown by as much as 30 percent,” Tine spokesman Lars Galtung told AFP.

Last Friday, customs officers stopped a Russian at the Norwegian-Swedish border and seized 90 kilos (198 pounds) of butter stashed in his car.

http://www.timeslive.co.za/world/2011/12/12/norway-butter-shortage-threatens-christmas-treats